<var id="8Tdjms3"><strike id="8Tdjms3"></strike></var>
<var id="8Tdjms3"></var>
<var id="8Tdjms3"></var>
<listing id="8Tdjms3"><ruby id="8Tdjms3"></ruby></listing>
<menuitem id="8Tdjms3"></menuitem><var id="8Tdjms3"></var>
<listing id="8Tdjms3"></listing><cite id="8Tdjms3"></cite>
<cite id="8Tdjms3"></cite>
<cite id="8Tdjms3"><span id="8Tdjms3"><progress id="8Tdjms3"></progress></span></cite>
<thead id="8Tdjms3"><ruby id="8Tdjms3"><progress id="8Tdjms3"></progress></ruby></thead>
<th id="8Tdjms3"><strike id="8Tdjms3"></strike></th>
<video id="8Tdjms3"><noframes id="8Tdjms3">
<strike id="8Tdjms3"></strike>
<strike id="8Tdjms3"></strike>
MASTHEAD 48

tỷ lệ cá cược bóng đá u23

ANTENNAE

THE JOURNAL OF NATURE

IN VISUAL CULTURE

 

 

SUNSET 47 masthead 5.5.19 copy

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

WHITE GRADIENT 1 Facebook circle white small

Antennae is a peer-reviewed, non-funded, independent, quarterly academic journal. All rights of featured content of website and PDF publication are reserved. Editor in Chief: Giovanni Aloi. 2017

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae Issue 29 87 Antennae Issue 29 86 Antennae Issue 29 85

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

The interface is an agentially charged field — it reveals itself as a productive material dimension through which our thinking, questions, and assumptions are formed, mapped, shaped, and tested. From this perspective, the interface manifests itself as an artistic material surface—a creative and reactive  field through which we modulate the bandwidth of a perceptual gap—the poetic and philosophical distance between us and the actants and systems we study. And because of its inherent agential potential, the interface is also prone to become an ethicalbattle field. In- terfaces are sites of negotiation—they are selective. The same interface reveals very di erent aspects of reality when used in di erent disciplinary settings. a

s

2017-12-02 09.40.16

DOUGFOG GIOVANNIALOI GRAHAMHARMAN CAROLINEPICARD  

LYNNTURNER

RONBROGLIO KATHYHIGH JESSICAULLRICH

HENRIKH?KANSSON ANDREWYANG ERWINDRIESSENS

MARIAVERSTAPPEN

KENRINALDO MUSTAFASABBAGH CECILIANOVERO DOROTHYCROSS

ANGELASINGER

 

 

CAROL J ADAMS

SUZANNE ANKER

JONATHAN BIRTH

DOROTHY CROSS

CARSTON HOLLAR

GARY HUME

OLEG KULIG

ROSEMARYTROCCO

PAULINE OLIVERO

PETER SINGER

LOISWAINTERBER

CARY WOLFE

 

 

 

Keith Armstrong | Elizabeth Atkinson | Sarah Bezan | Lee Blalock | Sougwen Chung |  Anna Dumitriu | Gilberto Esparza | Aki Inomata | Eduardo Kac | Roger Malina |

Sam Nightingale |Laura Splan | Bernd

Scherer | Dana Simmons | Sylvia Solakidi | Andrew  Yang  

AND MANY MORE

ANTENNAE

42 cover

THE JOURNAL OF NATURE

IN VISUAL CULTURE

ISSUE 48 — SUMMER 2019

interface

From this generative condition, however, sometimes stems the mistrust that limits collaborations in art and science. It is in this context that, in art and science, the interface can be configured as a political site of negotiation through which we can envision alternative futures. This is one of the most important roles collaborations in art and science can play—to instill empathy and promote engagement in the conception of a world that’s more than a resource and that we can engage with beyond the baseline of functionalism.

 

This is the second installment of a project co-edited in collaboration with American artist and philosopher Jonathon Keats whose bold experiments have raised important questions and put into practice his conviction that the world needs more “curious amateurs” willing to explore publicly whatever intrigues them in defiance of a culture that increasingly forecloses on wonder and silos knowledge into narrowly defined areas of expertise.

 

IN THIS ISSUE

Dr. GIOVANNI ALOI

Editor in Chief of AntennaeProject

34 essays and interviews

featuring key contemporary artists and scholars

329 pages

202 illustrations

GEERDT MAGIELS

p 13 p 93 p 52 p 164

p 93

p 69

p 72

quotation

Art and science start from the same sense of wonder. The art of critical observation is a basic ingredient of all research: the assessment and analysis of acts, statements or thoughts. The critical mind searches for the limits of what people know or think they know, it examines the scope of available knowledge, and in so doing also calls for modesty.

quotation two Vanmechelen

MICHAEL McCLURE: MEAT THYSELF

by Stefan Benz

5A HANGER XRAY

 

Biologist and philosopher of science Geerdt Magiels talked to Koen Vanmechelen about his work. Each piece tells a story in which the local

and the global interact. A reflection on

art, science, culture, and society.  MORE >>

 

Gilberto Esparza is a Mexican artist

whose work involves electronic and

robotic means to investigate the

impacts of technology in everyday

life, social relationships, environment

and urban structure. He currently

conducts research projects on

alternative energies. His practice

employs recycling consumer

technology and biotechnology

experiments. MORE >>

 

Parasitos Urbanos’

Text and Images by Gilberto Esparza

 

LABIOMISTA: Biology, Art, and Philosophy

Text Geerdt Magiels, Images Koen Vanmechelen

Plan

 

Laura Splan’s Embodied Objects series uses biosensors to produce data-driven forms and patterns for objects and images. The project

examines the potential for objects to embody human experience and to materialize the intangible.  MORE >>

 

Embodied Objects

Text and images by Laura Splan

Malina

 

Roger Malina’s remarkable career spans the natural sciences, art, design, and education. In this interview with Andrew Yang, Malina discusses his exceptional role as editor of Leonardo and the challenges involved in working at the intersection of art andf science. MORE >>

 

A Node within a Network of Networks: An Interview with Roger Malina

Andrew Yang interviews Roger Malina

 

As a neuroscientist, Dana Simmons studied how autism affects the cerebellum, a brain region that supports our balance and posture,

and helps us learn new movements.

Dana used a high-powered microscope and manipulated laser light and color filters to create these intriguing neuron portraits.

MORE >>

 

Dana Simmons: Micrographs

Text and Images text by Dana Simmons

DanaSimmons

 

Inomata’s work often involves 3D printing and relies on collaborations with animals. Together, works like Why Not Hand Over a ‘Shelter’ to

Hermit Crabs? and Think Evolution draw important considerations on notions of deep-time, mobility, temporality, and change. MORE >>

 

Aki Inomata:

Think Evolution

Text and Images by Aki Inomata

nyc_bright_brink

 

Para-photo-mancy is a series of experimental photographic artworks that utilise the inherent photo(phyto) chemical capacities of plants to

produce images. MORE >>

 

Sam Nightengale's

Para-photo-mancy

Text and images by Sam Nightingale

 

This article considers the health and safety challenges that my collaborators and I face in producing and exhibiting artworks, which take

the form of sculptural objects or installations and incorporate diverse materials such as altered historical objects or textiles combined with bacteria and DNA.  MORE >>

 

Contemporary Relics:

Threads Across Time

in Bio Art

Text and images by Anna Dumitriu

Dimitriu Nightingale

 

As consilience results from transformation through the mirror of the other, Jan Fabre takes from Giacomo Rizzolatti a model for his

theatre and Rizzolatti takes from Fabre an image for brain function.  MORE >>

 

Let Yourself be a Mirror

By Sylvia Solakidi

 

An artist reflects on research-based

practice, the conception of a special

committee Ph.D. in Interdisciplinary

Arts and Science at the University of

Wisconsin-Madison, and the privileges

of working, learning, and teaching at the

intersections of disciplines. MORE >>

 

Sougwen Chung:

Drawing Operations

Text and images by Sougwen Chung

Soladiki sougwenChung_images1 copy

 

Inspired by science fiction, futurism, and technology itself, Lee Blalock’s work is an exercise in body modification by way of amplified behavior or “change-of-state”.

MORE >>

 

Engineering Spaces

for Cyborgs

Text and Images by Lee Blalock aka L[3]^2

Bezan Blalock

 

Regenesis Aesthetics: Visualizing the Woolly Mammoth in De-Extinction Science

By Sarah Bezan

 

Art-Eco-Science practitioner Keith Armstrong and sustainability scholar Tania Leimbach explore how artists hope to radically transform ourattitudes, perceptions, and modes of

participation. MORE >>

 

Art-Eco-Science.

Field Collaborations

In-conversation: Keith Armstrong and

Tania Leimbach

Armstrong

 

This essay explores the interconnecting elements at play in the practice of Tomás Saraceno, one very much studio-based and rooted in human/non-human collaboration.

 

Tomás Saraceno:

Atkinsons Scherer

 

Eduardo Kac is considered a pioneer of bioestetic and telematic research. He is widely recognized for his interactive installations and his Bio Art. His work deals with issues that range from the mythopoetics of online experience to the cultural impact of biotechnology, collective agency the

creation of life and evolution.

Kac

 

Bernd Scherer, director of HKW in Berlin talks to Giovanni Aloi about the importance of engage-ment in the context of anthropogenic research and contemporary art

BROWSE ANTENNAE 47

p 52

p 13

p 164

Screen Shot 2019-07-26 at 14.36.24

Interfacing nature and culture through art and science

 

 

By Elizabeth Atkinson

 

Eduardo Kac:

From Holopoems to Outer Space

 

 

Giovanni Aloi interviews Eudardo Kac

Curating the Anthropocene

 

Giovanni Aloi interviews Bernd Scherer

 

Bernd Scherer: